About

Who I Am

Name: Matt Fehskens
Location: NJ, USA
What I Do: Front-end development

How It All Started

I think I was a freshman in high school when our next door neighbor’s foreign exchange student introduced me to HTML pages and Geocities. I can still see my very first page: black background with text and images stacked each separated by an <hr>. It was like a revelation–I could write a little bit of text and it’d create something others could see? I was hooked forever.

A Long Way From the Start

After 14 years of learning and working, I finally got my first professional web development job (after ~7 years in a job I didn’t love). My love for web development has never waned either. Even when I wasn’t working in the field, I was doing it in my spare time. I feel truly lucky every day that I get to do something I love as my profession.

I slowly began learning about professional development through the writings of others. I’m heavily influenced by the writings of Robert “Uncle Bob” Martin and think his guides on both how to code and how to be a professional developer should be on every developer’s reading list.

What I Want to Accomplish

When I started getting to paid to develop I saw tons of code out there (including my own) that was being developed through this type-refresh-repeat cycle that was mostly guess-and-check. It didn’t make sense to me–here developers are working in a logic-based field not using that very logic to drive decision-making. After reading a little on testing quickly became something I was passionate about and is one of those topics I want to help others make part of their daily development cycle.

I also am interested in technique over tools. Don’t get me wrong, Node has changed the JavaScript landscape in a positive way and all the frameworks and libraries that pop up are helping developers accomplish more at a faster pace. But I think that the basics are what are important: algorithms, patterns, and trying to get the most out of the least code. Here I’m going to do my best to make them accessible to everyone.